RURA, other institutions record the highest likelihood of bribery in 2023 – Transparency International

RURA, other institutions record the highest likelihood of bribery in 2023 – Transparency International

 

Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority (RURA) along with other public and Private institutions came out on top for the sectors with the highest likelihood of bribery in the country, as reported by the Transparency International(TI) Rwanda on Thursday, December 7, 2023.

Since 2010, Transparency International Rwanda publishes the Rwanda Bribery Index (RBI), intended to shape the rates of corruption and bribery in Rwanda’s institutions.

This year’s Rwanda Bribery Index shows public institutions such as; Rwanda Utility Regulatory Authority (RURA), Rwanda Investigation Bureau ( RIB), Rwanda Standards Board (RSB) and pand the had a higher likelihood of bribery compared to other institutions in both public and public sectors in the country.

As instance , it indicates that RURA and the private sector have registered the highest likelihood of bribery, with 15.60% and 13.80% respectively.

In RURA, the likelihood sharply increased from 2.90% in 2021 to 6.00% in 2022, and now it has reached 13.80% in 2023.

The Rwanda Bribery Index reports that the national prevalence of bribery stands at 2.60% in 2023, down from 4.50% in 2022. The finding reveals that the private sector and secondary schools registered the highest prevalence of bribery, with 9.60% and 8.30% respectively.

Illegal construction and renovating houses in places not allowed by the Master Plan, along with obtaining a construction permit, emerge as the activities most prone to corruption payments in 2023, according to 52.4% and 34.9% of respondents respectively.

The Rwanda Bribery Index also indicates that the school feeding program in the Nine-Year Basic Education Program is affected by corruption, as perceived by 25% of citizens participating in the survey.

The report highlights that a low level of reporting remains among the challenges impeding the fight against corruption. The findings reveal that 94.2% did not report encountered corruption cases (up from 87.5% in 2022).

The main reasons provided were: “It did not occur to me that I should report” (32%), fear of self-incrimination (21.30%), the belief that no action would be taken even if they reported corruption (15.40%), fear of intimidation (11.50%), and not knowing where to report (4%).

In her remarks, the Chief of Ombudsperson, Madeleine Nirere, underlined that the government of Rwanda has taken sound measures to curb corruption and reiterated Rwanda’s strong political will, embedded in the zero-tolerance to corruption policy.

Chief of Ombudsperson, Madeleine Nirere, underlined that the government of Rwanda has taken sound measures to curb corruption.
MUGIRANEZA Thierry

MUGIRANEZA Thierry

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